November 10, 2018 4 min read

U.S. Virgin Islands

Do you want to relax on the beaches of the Virgin Islands? Good news, you can - U.S. Virgin Islands passport requirements stipulate that as long as you don't touch foreign land before arrival, you don't need a passport. Because the United States Virgin Islands belongs to the United States Federation, it is considered a domestic travel of American citizens, so it is easy to take a tropical vacation without a passport.
However, when leaving the Virgin Islands, you may need to produce citizenship certificates, such as birth certificates stamped with official seals and valid government-issued identity cards. Although this does not mean that you need a passport to travel to the U.S. Virgin Islands, in any case, you may want to choose to carry your passport with you - so you only need to carry one document instead of two.
Also, remember that if you choose to visit the adjacent British Virgin Islands, you will need to have a valid American passport.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is the United States Federation, so if you travel from the United States and have a valid American driver's license, you do not need a passport. If you are going to any other Carribean destination, you may need a passport and should check with your local American embassy.

Whistler, British Columbia

Visas are not required for less than 180 days as British Columbia visitors to the United States. However, citizens of other countries and those who work, go to school or immigrate to Canada may need visas. The Canadian government provides online resources to help you determine whether you need a visa to visit Canada, but for most American citizens planning leisure visits, there is no need to apply for a visa.

Canada

As the Western Hemisphere Tourism Initiative (WHTI) was proposed by the U.S. government in 2004 to enhance border security and standardize travel documents in the United States, passport requirements are a complex and changing issue for U.S. tourists to Canada.
Tourists from all countries except the United States need passports to enter Canada. On the other hand, because of the friendly transit agreement between Canada and the United States, the Canadian Border Service does not require American citizens to show their passports to enter Canada.
This friendly transit agreement used to be mutual; however, now WHTI requires American citizens to have passports to return home by air.
In this way, passport requirements on the border between Canada and the United States are different on paper, but in fact, they are the same. Canada will not allow an American citizen to enter a country without suitable documents to go home.
The Canadian government requires U.S. citizens to fly to or transit through Canadian airports with passports, but not by land or by boat. For those travelers, Canada requires you to bring your nationality certificate, such as birth certificate, nationality or naturalization certificate, Indian identity certificate, and photo certificate, instead of your passport.

Alaska

American citizens flying between another state and Alaska do not need passports. However, those who stay in Canada through Canada or by ferry or cruise ship need to carry one. All non-US citizens need passports and other documents to enter the country. As with all travel plans, please contact the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency and the Transportation Safety Administration.

 

Key West, Florida

Unless you come from a different country or an illegal citizen, you don't need a passport to go to Florida. In fact, if you are an American citizen, you can travel anywhere in the United States without using a passport. If you want to go abroad, you only need one.

 

Belize

You must have a valid passport to enter Belize, at least six months before the expiration of the passport, but citizens of the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and most Caribbean and European Union countries do not need visas. The entry permit period is 30 days, and the renewal period is up to six months.

Guam

American citizens and legitimate permanent residents (LPRs) travel directly between parts of the United States, including Guam, Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Swains Island and the Federation of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). They do not have access to foreign ports or places and do not need to produce valid U.S. passports or U.S. green cards.
However, passengers are advised to bring a photocopy of the ID card and birth certificate issued by the government.
If you are asked to prove your identity, you are advised to carry any proof of your LPR status at all times. This may be the form of a green card or passport.

American Samoa

American citizens and legitimate permanent residents (LPRs) travel directly between parts of the United States, including Guam, Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Swains Island and the Federation of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). They do not have access to foreign ports or places and do not need to produce valid U.S. passports or U.S. green cards

Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

American citizens and legitimate permanent residents (LPRs) travel directly between parts of the United States, including Guam, Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Swains Island and the Federation of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). They do not have access to foreign ports or places and do not need to produce valid U.S. passports or U.S. green cards

 


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